The Ministry of Lisa Copen

Lisa Copen, Founder of Rest Ministries which serves the chronically ill, shares about mothering, illness, ministry and more.

Archive for Chronic

Beyond Casseroles: How to Start a Chronic Illness/Pain Ministry

Does your church know how to reach out to people who live with chronic illness?

How should you react when God doesn’t choose to heal?

When are casseroles and get-well cards not appropriate? If you’ve ever wondered about the do’s and don’t’s of witnessing to someone with a chronic illness, you won’t want to miss this!

  • Lisa will lead you through how your church can more effectively outreach to people who live daily with illness and pain through her own experiences and stories of others.
  • You will be given an opportunity to see “church” through the eyes of someone in pain, and recognize the small changes that your church can make to have a more effective illness/pain ministry to hurting individuals.

Appropriate for churches, church leadership or conferences. 50 minutes, but can be adapted.

How to Help a Hurting Friend

Have you ever had a friend who was hurting and you didn’t know what to say? How do you know when to quote the Scriptures and when to just listen? If someone you care about lives with chronic illness, grief, or emotional pain, you won’t want to miss the opportunity to learn how to be a good friend. If you live with illness or disability, you will smile in understanding as Lisa shares her experiences and the stories of others who live with chronic illness. The time spent will give you a sense of relief and comfort, as you learn how to express your sincerity to hurting friends.

Appropriate for Christian and secular audiences. 45 minutes, but can be adapted.

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Invisible Disabilities: Effective Tools Every Church Should Have


As presented at the Joni and Friends Disability Ministry Summit, 2007

With nearly one in two people having a chronic illness, it impacts most families; the invisibility of it, however, often inhibits the church from realizing its prevalence and how many people are suffering silently. It’s easy for hurt feelings to abound and for ill people to feel like a burden, not a blessing. Awareness and simple tools to increase your outreach to both members and non-members will make your church a shelter from life’s storms.

YOU WILL LEARN…

  • Why the church needs to know that half their audience on Sunday may look a lot better than how they feel. For example, 75% of marriages that include an illness end in divorce. Learn why illness ministry needs to be understood by all church staff and how to get their attention when they already have too much to do.
  • How to uncover the needs people with illness have if they don’t speak up until they’ve decided to leave the church. How to avoid hurt feelings and increase communication.
  • Practical ways to get your church body more enthusiastic about meeting the needs of church members who live with illness, how to approach your church about it, and set ministry priorities. How to teach them about the blessings the chronically ill will bring, not burdens.
  • How to respond when the church leadership says, “But he’s not a member… so we can’t help him.” Reaching beyond our church walls is vital because New Age religions do it very well and people in pain follow whoever shows them love.
  • How to create a welcoming environment for the chronically ill members and visitors in ten inexpensive, fast ways.

Appropriate for Christian audiences. 60 minutes, but can be adapted.

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Communicating with Your Spouse About Your Chronic Pain

This article is free to reprint. Keep everything “as is” and include the resource “box” at the end that refers back to Rest Ministries. Thank you! ~Lisa

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Communicating with Your Spouse About Your Chronic Pain

couple-cuddle“I feel like there are thumb tacks in my bed!” I say to my husband as he crawls into the other side of our bed. “I know there is nothing there, but I just feel bruised all over.”

“I’m sorry,” he offers with a sympathetic voice, but there is little else he can do.

“Actually, I sort of feel nauseous too,” I share. “It’s probably just the drugs. I wonder if I should eat something or if that would make it worse. I’m sure it will pass if I can just get to sleep.” I look over and he is already starting to snore.

For many of us, our spouse is our best friend. If our relationship is good, we want to share our feelings with them. Even if our relationship is hurting, we feel that by explaining our pain, our spouse may sympathize and be more loving toward us.

Although we don’t want to burden them by constantly sharing about our aches and pains, when we are hurting there is a desire to be heard and have our feelings validated. By talking out loud about what we are feeling, it somehow makes the pain real. It’s no longer “all in our head.”

Galatians 6:2 tells us “Carry each others burdens, and in this way you will fulfill the law of Christ.” At some point we must carry these burdens to the Lord, as well as a close friend, rather than just count on our spouse to carry the burden of listening about each ache.

Although your spouse may not be suffering from a physical ailment, there are still many losses that he is grieving. For example, it is an emotional thing to watch someone you love be in pain and not be able to fix it. He may be suffering as he watches you lose the ability to do things you love. He likely misses the couple outings you once took together when you could do physically active events, whether it was skiing, or just taking long walks together on the beach. He may be frustrated that even his hugs can cause you to wince. Counselors have found that there are three major areas where marriages suffer: money, time and physical intimacy.

Your marriage may be having difficulties in all three, specifically because of the role chronic illness has taken on within your marriage. Is it possible to “share our burdens” with our spouse without overburdening him and making him want to run the other way every time we open our mouth to share another symptom of our ailments?

Be a team with your spouse

It’s you and your spouse “up against” the illness. Although you may feel like your spouse is merely a spectator, intentionally make him a part of your team fighting the battle of pain, in whatever way he is most comfortable.

Ask your spouse if you can share some information about your illness so he has a better idea of what you are going through, but don’t overwhelm him. If he is willing to attend a few doctors appointments with you, let him, and give him time to ask the doctor his own questions. For example, giving him a brochure may be better than handing him a 250-page book. If he listens to podcasts, find some that would be beneficial for him to listen to. Acknowledge that there may be role or responsibility shifts in the marriage due to the illness. Be open about what you are struggling with and where you need help. For example, if you can no longer scrub that bathroom but, let him know before the grime gets out of hand.

Connie Kennemer lives with multiple sclerosis and she candidly shares that struggle that it can be to find the right balance and word. “I am not as mobile as I used to be and I often ask more of my husband such as ‘Can you work at home this afternoon?’ or ‘Why do you have to go to another meeting?’ How much should he accommodate me because my body is changing? He doesn’t always know when to stop and encourage me to try things myself. This is a constant challenge.”

Be reasonable in your expectations

We often marry someone who has our opposite personality style. If you need to read every article about your illness, but your spouse doesn’t, it may simply be because your spouse has a more laissez faire attitude, not because he doesn’t care. His response to a crisis may appear to be nonchalant on the outside, but it doesn’t mean he is not worried and concerned about you.

On the flip side, maybe you are emotionally overwhelmed the diagnosis and you need to just sit back and take it all in before you start doing research, while your spouse is spending hours at the computer finding out everything he can on the latest treatments, medications, and signing you up for the healing service at church. He may accuse you of being in denial about it all, since you aren’t showing as much passion as he is in finding out more about your illness. An excellent book recommend in helping you understand your communication styles better is “Men are Like Waffles, Women are Like Spaghetti” by Bill and Pam Farrell.

Have information about your illness available for when he is ready

If you are having a conversation and you want to explain more about how you are feeling, or details about the illness itself, you may want to have books with sticky notes on the pages you think he’s find most helpful. Or bookmark pages you can read together and then discuss. Connie says, “After ten years of living with MS, I am past the whiney stage, but Rex sometimes holds back; that’s when I need to ask him more questions about his feelings.”

Creatively keep him informed about the embarrassing parts of the illness

If your illness is going to cause you to be in the bathroom during eighty percent of the events you attend together, you need to let your spouse know that this is part of the disease. Health organizations have brochures on symptoms. You can say, “I’m dealing with some personal matters of this illness right now; I don’t really want to talk about them yet, but they’re in this brochure if you’re wondering.” Avoid sharing every detail if you can.

Look for other ways to vent besides always dumping on your spouse

“I realized that I held onto all of my frustrations of pain during the day and then ‘threw’ them at my husband as he came in the door,” shares Cheryl, who lives with chronic fatigue syndrome. “My actions set the tone for our entire evening and even though I felt better, he felt worse, and it lasted all night. He was beginning to dread coming home at night.”

Cheryl began to put aside the last two hours of her day to spend time writing in her journal, praying and doing something she enjoyed that calmed her. “Writing in my journal gave me the chance to express my frustrations, and then prayer really began to minimize the negativity too. My husband quickly noticed a difference and it’s made our relationship so much stronger.”

Find some ways to get involved in your community or a special hobby

What else do you have going on in your life, other than your illness? It’s easy to be overwhelmed with doctor’s appointments and just maintaining our illness, but it can result in a pretty dull life. Even if you have limited energy, do something you’ve always wanted to do that doesn’t have a deadline. Put together memory albums for your grandchildren, clean out just one drawer, find a new craft or hobby, volunteer to be on a prayer chain. Soon you will find that your illness actually is the last thing you want to talk about when you have had such more interesting events in your day.

Conclusion

So. . . How much is too much? It’s different for each person and each marriage relationship. Learn to look at your situation objectively. How many times are you bringing up your illness? How are you benefiting from talking about it more than necessary? Do you need understanding? Validation? Perhaps you need actual physical help with tasks. Ask yourself if talking about your illness could be a way of getting your spouse’s attention, and this seems to be the only thing he responds to? Regardless of whether it is attention, acknowledgment or understanding, how can you get this from God instead? How is it negatively affecting your life or those around you?

And then take a moment to really ask yourself “Is there a better, more creative way that I can create intimacy with my spouse, other than just complaining about each ache and pain? What activities can I still share that could help us grow closer together?”

And then when you want to share more about your pain or illness say a prayer first: “Lord, You know I don’t want to burden anyone else, especially when they cannot fix it. I really need a hug from you right now. I know that my spouse cares about me and wants to encourage me, even when he doesn’t always show it the way I want; please give me the wisdom to know when to ask for help and comfort from him/her and when to come only to You and ask you to fulfill all of my emotional needs.”

For more articles and important support while living with chronic illness or pain visit Rest Ministries so you don’t miss our fresh content and be entered for our monthly giveaway. Lisa Copen is the director of Rest Ministries, author of “Beyond Casseroles: 505 Ways to Encourage a Chronically Ill Friend” and founder of National Invisible chronic illness Awareness Week.

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Share Your Mom Stories for My New Mom w/ Illness Book

mom-childAre you a Christian mom with a chronic illness who has kids under 10… or just remembers having kids under 10? If so, you may want to consider adding your input to my new book for chronically ill Chistian moms!

If you sign up for this “group” Christian Moms with Illness Book Team you will only be notified of what I am looking for for the book: example, anecdotes, advice, your stories, etc.

Your replies will not be public, and this is not a group where you will send emails to other members. It’s just a “tool” to be able to reach you and I will let you know if your suggestions make it into the book!

I am also looking for moms who also have the illness but may be the caregiver for someone else, moms with illness who have ill kids, single moms, etc. If you are an adult who grew with with a chronically ill mom, I also have some question for you!

If you are a mom and you have an illness you qualify.

Sign up here.

I look forward to working with you!
Lisa Copen

PS: Looking for mom support? Visit our Sunroom Groups:

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Who is Talking About What for Invisible Illness Week Conference?

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We hope you will join us during some of the seminars for
National Invisible Chronic Illness Awareness Week starting tomorrow (Monday, Sept 14)

All times are pacific time, USA
Listen here http://www.invisibleillnessconference.com

Find out all information , speakers and more at http://www.invisibleillnessweek.com

Feel free to pass this along! (In fact, we’d LOVE you to do so!)

SEPT 14

MONDAY – 9 AM
Understanding How we Uniquely Deal with Difficulties in Life
Georgia Shaffer

MONDAY – 12 PM
Finding Health Insurance Coverage with a Pre-existing Condition
Jennifer Jaff

MONDAY – 3 PM
Super Foods for Super-Natural Health
Joanna Faillace

MONDAY – 5:30 PM
Hearts of Gratitude and Joy
Maureen Pratt

SEPT 15

TUESDAY 9 AM
Coping with Chronic Illness in Your Marriage
Bill & Pam Farrell

TUESDAY 12 PM
Coping with Crises on Top of Chronic
Jennifer Saake & Lisa Copen

TUESDAY 3 PM
How to Start a Business When You are Chronically Ill
Kirsten Borrink

TUESDAY 5:30 PM
To to Be Announced
Kelly Rouba

SEPT 16

WEDNESDAY 9 AM

It’s OK to say NO: Building Healthy Boundaries
Jenni Prokopy

WEDNESDAY 12 PM
Parenting When You are Chronically Ill – Chaos and Confessions
Dena Dyer, talking with Lisa Copen

WEDNESDAY 3 PM
Simplifying Your Home and Housework
Marcia Ramsland

WEDNESDAY 5:30 PM
Real Talk About Men and Chronic Illness
Jeff Kenyon

SEPT 17

THURSDAY 9 AM
Find the Job You Desire and Can Do
Rosalind Joffe

THURSDAY 12 PM
When Your Child is Chronically Ill
Jolene Philo

THURSDAY 3 PM
Managing College with a Chronic Illness
Lynn Royster

THURSDAY 5:30 PM
Helping Others Understand Your Pain
Karen Richards

SEPT 18

FRIDAY 9 AM
Applying and Winning Disability Assistance When You Are Chronically Ill
Scott Davis

FRIDAY 12 PM
Being a Teenager with a Chronic Illness
Naomi Kingery

FRIDAY 3 PM
Surgery Preparation
Curtis Dean Hall

FRIDAY 5:30 PM
Closing workshop
Lisa Copen and guests

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Christian Illness Ministry Sponsors 5-Day Virtual Conference Online

09_logo-for-blogSBWIRE – SEPT 14, 2009 / Nearly 1 in 2 people in the USA live with a chronic illness and about 96% of these illnesses are invisible.* Rest Ministries, Inc., the largest Christian organization that serves the chronically ill, and an affiliate of Joni Eareckson Tada’s International Disability Ministry, is encouraging those with illness, friends, family, caregivers, and churches to get involved in their annual outreach, National Invisible Chronic Illness Awareness Week, September 14-20, 2009.

In addition to churches having outreach events for those with chronic conditions, Rest Ministries organizes a 5-day free virtual conference with 20 seminars that can be attended via one’s computer and computer speakers. Seminars are on a variety of topics including marriage, parenting, starting a business, how to apply for disability and more—all when you live with a chronic illness. The seminars are held via Blog Talk Radio and listeners can call in through their phone line with questions.

Well known Christian authors who will be presenting include:

  • Bill and Pam Farrel, best-selling authors; The Marriage Code (Harvest House, 2009)
  • Naomi Kingery, author of Sugar Free Me (Xulon Press, 2008)
  • Dena Dyer, author of Mothers of the Bible (Barbour Publishing, 2009)
  • Georgia Shaffer, author of How Not to Date a Loser (Harvest House, 2008)
  • Joanna Faillace, Certified Biblical Health Coach an author of Super-Naturally Healthy Families Cookbook Devotional
  • Lisa Copen, author of Beyond Casseroles: 505 Ways to Encourage a Chronically Ill Friend (Rest Publishers, 2008)
  • Maureen Pratt, author of Peace in the Storm: Meditations on Chronic Pain & Illness (Galilee Trade, 2005)
  • Jennifer Saake, author of Hannah’s Hope: Seeking God’s Heart in the Midst of Infertility, Miscarriage and Adoption Loss (NavPress, 2005)
  • Marcia Ramsland, author of Simplify Your Life (Thomas Nelson, 2004)
  • Jolene Philo, author of A Different Dream for My Child (Discovery House Publishers 2009)

Lisa Copen, 40, founder of Rest Ministries says, “Many Christians may have a solid walk with the Lord, but the emotional roller coaster of a chronic illness and its constant progression can leave them feeling alone and misunderstood. They are hanging on by a thread and being told they look fine and should just make themselves get up and go to church only adds to the isolation and bitterness of others ‘not getting it.’ The emotional scars can be harder to cope with than the actual illness.”

Copen, who has lived with rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia since the age of twenty-four, ended up in the hospital for a week last fall fighting off the flesh eating bacteria in an ankle wound. We never know what the next day will hold,” she explains. “It is so important that there is good communication between those who are ill and their loved ones, as well as the church body.”

Did Copen’s circle of friends and church come through for her? “It was an enlightening experience,” she says. “Although I teach others to ask for help, I found out how difficult it is. And then when I did ask for help, I experienced what it is like when you fall through the cracks and everyone thinks someone else is providing both the practical support as well as emotional encouragement.”

Rest Ministries extends their outreach about invisible illness awareness to churches, providing materials to start up HopeKeepers groups, books, cards, tracts, etc. About 96% of those with illness may appear perfectly healthy on Sunday mornings, but may struggle to get out of bed the remainder of the week.

Ken Chambers, Director of Church Relations at Joni and Friends International Disability Center, says, “It is vital that Christians understand the emotional and spiritual trials of those with invisible disabilities, as well as those with visible disabilities. I encourage church leaders to take advantage of the wealth of resources at Rest Ministries and to participate in the National Invisible Chronic Illness Awareness Week, which they sponsor annually.”

One can get involved by joining the hundreds of bloggers who are writing about illness in the next few days, by joining the cause on Facebook, and most especially, by tuning in for the conference. All seminars will also be recorded and archived.

See http://www.invisibleillness.com for more information or http://www.restministries.org for the sponsor of this event, Rest Ministries.

*Source: Chronic Care in America, U.S. Census Bureau

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Joni and Friends Celebrates Anniversary

book-joniWhen I was young I read the book Joni and saw the movie. That this young woman’s life could be turned around in a second, all from a simple dive, was scary to hear. But to see her faith, regardless of her circumstances, was amazing and inspiring.

Years later, at the age of 24 I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. I looked for the chronic illness Christian organization for those with illness. I was familiar with Joni and Friends, her ministry for the disabled, but I didn’t feel like it “fit” what I was going through at the time.  I wasn’t in a wheelchair, after all. I just would never be able to wear high heels ever again.

But after searching Christian bookstores for a resource and scouring the Christian ministries I was aware of I couldn’t find anything. I was surprised! Where did Christians turn when they were told “You have diabetes” or “You have rheumatoid arthritis”? Yes, of course, God could heal me. But what if He chose not to? And what if it was ten years from now? I needed people who understood what I was going through- now!. And the secular support groups were just making me more depressed (too much venting and negativity and no hope at all…)

I started a little newsletter called …And He Will Give You Rest.  It was 1997 and I was just beginning to become familiar with the Internet. I built a little web site. People started to connect.

My husband and I went to hear Joni speak and I stood in line to have her sign my book but really just to talk to her. I told her about my ministry and asked if anyone else was doing illness ministry. She said “Not that I know of” and basically told me to “go for it!” Well… I did. I never looked back and always hoped I could somehow fulfill the vision God gave me.

jonisYears later I was honored to be on Joni’s radio program. She has her ministry send out our brochures when people call her ministry who have an illness. I served on the board of directors for an organization she had begun called the Christian Persons with Disabilities. A couple times a year I flew around the country and our board met to talk about disability and illness ministry in churches today and how we could make leaders more aware of the opportunities and joy people with disabilities can bring to a congregration. But Joni wasn’t there… Sometimes she had planned to be and her own health issues prevented her from coming.

At a christian book expo I found a copy of one of her paintings: Heaven. It is on the wall in my office. Her book When God Weeps is one of the best I’ve ever read.

One time I was exhibiting at a church conference where she was the keynote speaker. She zoomed by in her chair and said, “Hey, Lisa! How are you? I’m going to eat lunch over there. Come on over and join me!”

I don’t remember what I said. Nothing eloquent. My sister was standing beside me and said “She knows your name! She knows your name!”

I wandered over and had the joy of sharing a meal with her in a cafeteria setting behind the exhibit room, just her and I and her assistant.

And then one day someone from their office called me. (Me?) He had a chronic illness and had talked to Joni and thought Rest Ministries would be a good fit for an affiliate organization of Joni and Friends. I had assumed since we were more of an illness ministry and not so much a disability ministry, we wouldn’t be eligible. I attended my first meeting and the compassion of all of the staff was amazing.

A couple years ago I was to speak and exhibit at a conference organized by Joni and Friends. Days before we had to evacuate for about 5 days due to fires coming through our neighborhood. We packed 2 cars. One with our stuff. One with our exhibit stuff. I wrote my presentation sitting at a picnic table on La Jolla shores–the only place where one could breath a bit in all of San Diego county. I tried to concentrate on what I was to be doing in a few days and yet both my husband and I felt a sense that God really could take our home to make us have a spiritual lightening bolt moment in our lives. (Thankfully we weren’t right. God gave us grace and saved our home.)

But I remember my husband asking me… “What if we lose our home? Will we still go up to LA and go to Joni’s conference?” (Thinking, surely not, right?)

And without missing a beat I said, “There are no people I would rather be around after those at Joni and Friends those first few days.”

I don’t even know a lot of J&F staff or volunteers, but that’s how loved you feel. It would have been like being with my closest family during the most difficult time of our lives.

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I hope you will celebrate with me this special time for Joni. Below is the press release I received today and wanted to share it with you. I wish I could say Joni and I just hang out, but that’s not true. Despite my involvement with her ministry I still stand in awe of her. When I am at a conference or her office building, she always is so busy and I know she is tired and don’t want to bother her. But her ministry and her message (through speaking, books, and sense of humor through anything) has been one of the joys in my life.

When I started Rest Ministries I had no idea what I was doing. Sometimes I think nothing has changed. I still feel in over my head, especially when my health issues mess with my schedule (I had to cancel participating last year in J&F’s conference due to having that bummer flesh eating bacteria). I will never measure up to Joni’s ministry, but is my hope that, by using it as my blueprint, I can bring glory to God.

jaf-rooms.pgA couple years ago I had the opportunity to go up and visit her new building (see right). It’s beautiful. You can stand in one place and sing and it echoes all over the building. The chapel is amazing. If you are ever in Agoura Hills, CA (north of LA) you can take a tour.

The whole building was designed for ministry (cute little places to sit and pray), comfort (it feels so light and refreshing) and to make anyone in a wheelchair feel normal (a building that makes the wheelchair ramps appear to be nothing but design inspired to add to the visual pleasure). A waterfall in the reception area immediately calms you and makes you feel like –for a moment– all is right with our world.

jonisdesk meAnd then I got to see Joni’s desks – one was spotless but the other one, the real working desk…? Let’s just say for a moment was thrilled because it looked as full as mine! It stands as a reminder to get back to work because when it comes to illness or disability ministry “The harvest is plentiful, but the workers are few.” Matthew 9:37

If Joni has blessed you (as I know she has – many of you) remember to drop her a note or a birthday card in the next couple of months.

Lisa

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As Joni Eareckson Tada observes her 60th birthday in October, this year also marks the 30th anniversary of the ministry she founded to provide support and outreach to individuals with disabilities and their families — inspired from her own experience as a quadriplegic trying to adapt and survive in an inaccessible world.

Tada became a quadriplegic at the age of 17 as the result of a diving accident. As part of her rehabilitation, she learned to paint beautiful pictures with her mouth, which she showed at local art fairs. She was featured on a local television program, after which NBC’s “The Today Show” booked her for an interview with Barbara Walters.

“After that interview, things kind of exploded,” Tada said. “A publisher asked if I would write a book (I did and its called “Joni”) and the Billy Graham film ministry did a story on my life.

“This resulted in thousands of letters from disabled people,” Joni continued. “These letters inspired me to begin this important ministry, responding to people seeking advice and encouragement.”

Joni and Friends was established in 1979, in Burbank, Calif., and Tada began the now- internationally-syndicated radio program “Joni and Friends” in 1982. The ministry grew and moved to a new location in Agoura Hills in 1986.

One of the ministry’s best-known programs is Wheels for the World, providing wheelchairs for individuals with disabilities all over the world. Family Retreats are another renowned JAF outreach, during which individuals with disabilities and their entire families are encouraged and given a real respite during a week-long “summer camp” atmosphere.

As JAF has moved from a personality-focused programming ministry to a vision-driven movement, it has engaged in the bio-ethics debate, with the establishment of the Christian Institute on Disability. This development has helped prepare JAF to lead the Church into the 21st century, as technological advances outpace Christians’ engagement in science and culture.

A critical development in this growth and transition has been the addition of Doug Mazza as president and COO (Tada continues to serve as CEO). Mazza came to JAF in 1999 as executive vice president, moving to his new role in 2004. Drawing on his years of corporate management experience, Mazza helped initiate the transition from “Joni” to “Joni and Friends,” and encouraged a more collaborative and integrated organization.

Billy Burnett, vice president and chief financial officer, oversees financial and administrative systems at JAF, and along with other ministry leadership, is amazed at how God has blessed and grown Joni and Friends. The organization recently completed construction on a large, new hi-tech headquarters building — a model of accessibility for the 21st century.

As the ministry turns the corner on this its 30th year, it continues to fulfill Tada’s vision of accelerating ministry to those with disabilities. “If churches around the world would grasp the revolutionary truth that Christ’s transforming power always comes through sacrifice and weakness, it would dramatically alter the landscape of the global church,” Tada said.

In celebration of the 30th anniversary, JAF has established a special gold seal for use in all literature and communications. It serves as a reminder of how far the ministry has come, Mazza said, but is just the tip of the iceberg in how JAF plans to continue to grow and serve in the future.

“While we pause in appreciation of the past, we look forward with more excitement than ever, as we continue to see so many opportunities ahead,” Mazza added. “Because of Joni’s vision and foresight, JAF is poised to lead the Church in meeting the challenges of a new era — a time when technology has advanced and life has been devalued so that those with disabilities and those without a voice need a champion more than ever.”

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