The Ministry of Lisa Copen

Lisa Copen, Founder of Rest Ministries which serves the chronically ill, shares about mothering, illness, ministry and more.

Working when Sick

Workpain_4This survey by the National Pain Foundation (NPF) has found that "persistent, chronic pain has risen dramatically, up some 40 per cent, among full-time U.S. workers in the past 10 years."

Interesting, when you think that most of our ancestors were doing jobs with a great deal of physical labor–and risk to their health–such as working in mills, assembly lines, logging timber, building railroad tracks and doing farm work.

For those of us who live with chronic pain because of a chronic illness or accident, the news that people are in pain at work may not seem significant. After all, many of us work with daily pain already… others of us wish we could work but the pain is too unbearable.

But overall, when we feel so alone and like no one understands, I suppose it’s reassuring to know that more people may understand our discomforts and even severe pain than we originally believed. In fact, maybe someone we love who works full-time, actually is in pain and hasn’t even told us about it because it would seem minor to what we’re experiencing.

Hmmmm. We should never assume anything, right?

  • The NPF poll of more than 1,000 workers found the prevalence of chronic pain – defined as pain that lasts for at least six months – was now much more common in the workplace, at 26 per cent, than it was in 1996 (19 per cent).
  • What’s more, almost nine out of 10 employees with chronic pain typically went to work rather than staying home, the survey found.
  • The same percentage reported experiencing chronic pain at work "often" or "sometimes".
  • And the vast majority – 95 per cent – said their pain had to be either moderately or very severe before they stayed home from work.
  • "Chronic pain appears to be increasing in prevalence among U.S. workers as Americans age and lead more sedentary lifestyles," said Rollin Gallagher, editor-in-chief of the NPF website and clinical professor and director of the Center for Pain Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
  • "This survey indicates that employees with chronic pain must become their own advocates, understand the impact of their chronic pain and work with their healthcare provider to identify appropriate treatment options," he added.

Source: Nic Paton, Mary 1, 2007, http://www.management-issues.com


Link: Working when Sick.

The NPF poll of more than 1,000 workers found the prevalence of chronic pain – defined as pain that lasts for at least six months – was now much more common in the workplace, at 26 per cent, than it was in 1996 (19 per cent).
What’s more, almost nine out of 10 employees with chronic pain typically went to work rather than staying home, the survey found.
The same percentage reported experiencing chronic pain at work “often” or “sometimes”.
And the vast majority – 95 per cent – said their pain had to be either moderately or very severe before they stayed home from work.
“Chronic pain appears to be increasing in prevalence among U.S. workers as Americans age and lead more sedentary lifestyles,” said Rollin Gallagher, editor-in-chief of the NPF website and clinical professor and director of the Center for Pain Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
“This survey indicates that employees with chronic pain must become their own advocates, understand the impact of their chronic pain and work with their healthcare provider to identify appropriate treatment options,” he added.

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3 Comments»

  David Slabotsky, R.M.T. wrote @

I keep coming back to that old slogan “power to the people” and I think we have to become empowered to help ourselves. I’ve written a whole book about taking charge of your health after an illness, injury or disability: ” No Healthcare? No Problem! Learn how to be your own therapist.” Don’t work sick, and don’t be sick.There is so much we can do for ourselves, and this book shows you how.
Best Regards,
David Slabotsky, R.M.T.

  David Slabotsky, R.M.T. wrote @

Working in pain. living in pain, these conditions can make you feel so helpless and hopeless. It can be even worse when there isn’t healthcare available. I’ve written a book which addresses this problem and I hope you read it. It’s called “No Healthcare? No Problem! Learn how to be your own therapist”. I also have a blog at homecare.typepad.com/ where I write articles on the issues of self-care and homecare.
Best Regards,
David Slabotsky, R.M.T.

  David Slabotsky, R.M.T. wrote @

Working in pain. living in pain, these conditions can make you feel so helpless and hopeless. It can be even worse when there isn’t healthcare available. I’ve written a book which addresses this problem and I hope you read it. It’s called “No Healthcare? No Problem! Learn how to be your own therapist”. I also have a blog at homecare.typepad.com/ where I write articles on the issues of self-care and homecare.
Best Regards,
David Slabotsky, R.M.T.


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